Safety Must Be Prioritized In Drugs for Cancer

Despite the fact that the number of diagnosed cases of malignant mesothelioma are expected to rise in the next decades, there has been little real progress in available treatments, and the chemotherapy drug used to treat the disease is the same one that has been used for the last several  years. Though there is a natural push for new drugs to be brought to the market more quickly, Dr Richard Knight of ApconiX says ‘There’s a need for a change in attitude among researchers, and that there needs to be a greater emphasis for safety in the earliest stages of drug development rather than in the end stages’.

Read more here: Cancer Drug Developer Says Safety Must be Prioritised in Drugs for Cancers, Including Mesothelioma

 

 

By | 2018-05-23T16:46:08+00:00 May 16th, 2018|Press|Comments Off on Safety Must Be Prioritized In Drugs for Cancer

About the Author:

Professor Ruth A Roberts, PhD, ATS, FBTS, ERT, FRSB, FRCPath Director and Cofounder, ApconiX, UK and Chair and Director of Drug Discovery, University of Birmingham, UK Ruth is chair of drug discovery at Birmingham University, UK and Cofounder of ApconiX, an integrated toxicology and ion channel company that brings together a team of world-renowned nonclinical safety experts with over 400 years of drug discovery and development experience. Previously, Ruth was Global Head of Regulatory Safety at AstraZeneca and Director of Toxicology for Aventis. Ruth is an established science professional bringing rigorous expert thinking to toxicology, drug discovery and drug development. With >140 publications in peer reviewed journals, she is focused on reducing attrition attributable to safety and toxicity. A former president of the British Toxicology Society, former president of EUROTOX, former secretary to SOT and president elect of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences, Ruth was the recipient of the SOT Achievement award in 2002, the EUROTOX Bo Holmstedt Award in 2009 and the SOT Founders award in 2018 for outstanding leadership in toxicology.